Designing a Memory Machine – Internship opportunity

 

Overview

The Memory Machine project aims to create a device that allows for the contextualisation of personal memories (e.g., pictures, videos, music) into a core ’timeline’ of other shared and public multimedia content from various sources. This device (the Memory Machine, or MeMa) can be used a personalised digital souvenir or digital repository for the end-of-life. These artefacts will not only encapsulate rich emotional value in themselves, but offer engaging tools for personal reflection, history education, interventions for dementia care and for accessing cultural heritage.

An overview of the Memory Machine project can be found at on the Horizon website and on the project blog. We have completed the 4 workshops detailed on the project blog and have collected plenty of design material for a potential design of a physical memory machine. We have also completed some preliminary analysis of the workshop data and narrowed the design down to a small number of potentials. We are now at the point where we desire to build a fully functional prototype.

Accordingly, we welcome applications for an internship that will focus on producing designs (in the form of technical diagrams) for one or more Memory Machine prototypes. The successful candidate will work with the project team to produce the required designs.

Closing date

Applications must be made before the 1st of July 2019 and are assessed on an ongoing basis.

Proposed dates

The Internship will run 10 weeks, and is available for successful candidates to start as soon as possible. Please indicate your availability on the application form, where requested.

Accordingly, we welcome applications for an internship that will focus on producing designs (in the form of technical diagrams) for one or more Memory Machine prototypes. The successful candidate will work with the project team to produce the required designs.

Who should apply?

Ideal applicants should be studying for a postgraduate degree in engineering or product design.

Required skills

  • Technical drawing skills.
  • Background in design and/or engineering.

Eligibility and financial aspects

This is a full-time internship for 10 weeks. For postgraduate students who receive a stipend from their home university during the internship, a bursary of £300 per week will be available. For postgraduate students who suspend their stipend, a casual wage of £350 per week will be available, and this may be subject to tax deductions depending on the successful candidate’s circumstances.

In general, students from The University of Nottingham are able to apply on the understanding they suspend their stipend, this is due to the nature of the funding source. For overseas students a Visa must be in place, covering the duration of the internship.

Internships will be based at Jubilee Campus, The University of Nottingham (NG7 2TU), and may not be undertaken remotely. 

Informal enquiries

Informal enquiries may be made to Dominic Price, however applications should be made using the weblink below. Applications to this email address will not be accepted.

To apply, please complete the Internships Application Form

Do you regularly use the Hopper Buses at the University of Nottingham?

 

 In My Seat is recruiting…

We have created a mobile application designed to be used on your journeys around the campuses, which allows you engage with your local surroundings, by linking you to various types of content, including local information and user-generated content, through your specific journey.

We are looking for a group of people to test the prototype application and provide feedback on the experience.

This will involve

  • An induction session to install the app on your phone
  • Using the app for at least a week on your Hopper bus journeys
  • A feedback interview or focus group (TBC)

You will be thanked for your time with a £20 high street voucher.

The studies will begin in the week commencing 13th May 2019. For more information, and to register your interest, please email Dr Liz Dowthwaite.

Please note that to take part you must have an Android phone running at least version 4.4 (KitKat).

Hybrid Gifting

Two workshops have been held by the Hybrid Gifting Project.

The first – a card making workshop, took place at Debbie Bryan – an independent creative retailer based in Nottingham on 2nd November. The workshop focused on the giver/receiver relationship supporting participants to creative a ‘gift’, linking digital content and introducing tagging technologies.

The second workshop – Christmas themed – took place at the Mixed Reality Lab at the University of Nottingham on the 7th December. Participants got into the Christmas spirit by making Christmas cards and adding their individual digital layers of content.

Photo by Brigitte Tohm from Pexels

 

How do you think about your personal data?

Our cross cutting theme investigating the ways in which people commonly understand the use of personal data in products and services mediated by algorithms is looking for participants to take part in an online survey.

The questionnaire will help our researchers to understand how users of online services think about different types of data.

Participation is voluntary and at the end of the questionnaire, you will have a chance to enter a draw for a £50 shopping voucher.

Access more information about the online survey and a link to the questionnaire here.

 

 

Memory Machine Workshop 4

Researchers at Nottingham University would like to invite you to the fourth Memory Machine workshop, as part of a series of workshops that explore how new technologies can help us preserve memories that are important for us. You’re welcome regardless of whether or not you attended previous Memory Machine workshops.

Sarah Martindale – media researcher – will lead the interactive and creative workshop which will take place on Thursday 22nd of November,  12.00 – 4.00 pm at the Institute of Mental Health, Jubilee Campus.

Participants will receive a £10 high street shopping voucher as a thank you. Travel expenses to the venue will also be covered with lunch and refreshments provided.

Register here.

 

Memory Machine – an overview of our third workshop

Memory Machine Workshop 3

21st September 2018

Identity and wellbeing

We had a diverse group join us for our third workshop which started with a short walk outside, down to the Raleigh commemoration sculpture:

Landscapes prompt memories, as does the weather – as we found when it started raining! So we rapidly retreated indoors. We discussed local places and community connections and their importance in building a sense of familiarity and identity. One of our participants talked about walking around Nottingham, looking at old buildings, and that seeing a building or street from a particular angle would evoke a memory – perspective and place is so important in our memories. In Nottingham we are lucky to have archives from local industries; Raleigh bikes (the factory stood on the site of our new campus) and Boots pharmaceuticals and toiletries. Participants mentioned that Nottingham is also famous for less healthy products; such as beer and tobacco.

I gave a brief talk about how place is connected with health in many different ways. As well as working life, our home life and communities hold strong memories. We had three groups discussing their memories of place and community. Memories of Trent bridge leather tannery, and streets of small shops including a tattoo parlour!

Rachel Jacobs described some interactive and digital experiences that explored issues of wellbeing and place, as well as interesting interactive public displays and interventions. These included:

Rachel talked about how the Memory Machine might be able to link into similar forms of interactive experiences either at home or in familiar places, or areas of local interest so that people could both share and access their memories of these places. She spoke about the value of our memories and how the memories and experiences of older generations can enrich the experience of being in places and help us to understand the history, as well as the present and future of the place where we live and work.

Our three groups then considered how a digital ‘memory machine’ might capture some of these memories about place. One group considered an ‘outdoors Alexa’- a kind of ‘listening post’ where people could record, and share, their own recollections of that place – e.g. a street or a park. This idea grew legs! We discussed how people could meet at one of these posts, and then walk together, discussing memories, and recording them at the next post. With a mechanism to assign this shared recording to your personal account – when you got home you could listen again.

Listening again, or recording from one place, but playing back inside, prompted discussion of sharing with residents of a care home or others who may not be able to get out and about. We thought about how to encourage individuals and families at early stages of dementia to start recording memories, or making notes. We had health and social care practitioners in the group who shared their experience of caring for people, and how prompts and recordings could be useful.

Another group discussed a similar use of the memory machine in a park such as Gedling Country Park, with a listening area where people can sit and hear about the history of the park and colliery that used to be there and share their own memories, and people who can’t get to the park can also take part in the conversation and share experiences of being in the park and their own memories from home or a care centre. They also talked about how we manage difficult memories as well as joyful ones and how you can create the right experience to help people to access different memories in a positive way. The group also talked about the positives and negatives of technology and the internet and how it is affecting younger generations and changing how they communicate with each other – how it can both bring people together, and make people feel isolated.

During the session I learnt a lot about Nottingham from the older members of the group. How black lead was used in the laceworks, which would cause damage to the brain and memories of the workers. I said how lucky we are that we can just type into a websearch any locality or industry and rapidly find some information, pictures or archives. One group had discussed cigarette cards – the Google of their generation! Recalling previous generations, we discussed how statues and stained glass of churches were a way of representing Biblical people and stories when the text was in inaccessible Latin.

Places and industry can prompt painful memories; we should not ignore difficult memories, but be aware of our reactions to these. Overall, we discussed how familiar places are interlinked with and our sense of identity and wellbeing. Neil suggested that many of the topics could be linked to Five Ways to Wellbeing – an evidence base linking activities to health and wellbeing – Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Keep Learning and Give.

https://www.mind.org.uk/workplace/mental-health-at-work/taking-care-of-yourself/five-ways-to-wellbeing/

Raleigh archivehttp://www.iworkedatraleigh.com/

John Players archivehttps://www.nottingham.ac.uk/connectedcommunities/projects/john-player-archive.aspx

 

Written by Neil Chadborn

 

 

 

 

 

Memory Machine Workshop 3

Researchers at Nottingham University would like to invite you to the third Memory Machine workshop, as part of a series of workshops (4 in total) that explore how new technologies can help us preserve memories that are important for us.

Led by artist Rachel Jacobs and Research Fellow Neil Chadborn, this workshop will be interactive and creative and we welcome older adults, those caring for people with early onset dementia, historians and tech developers

Participants will receive a £10 and travel expenses to the venue covered and it includes lunch and refreshments. The workshop will take place at the Institute of Mental Health.

Everyone welcome. The venue is wheelchair accessible. Please email Rachel Jacobs to discuss any access requirements.

Register for this event here

Hybrid Gifting

How can we customize and combine physical things with digital content to create an enhanced personalised gift?

Our Hybrid Gifting project held its first meeting on the 9th of July, during which the project team was introduced to the Chronicle platform.

Card Making and Bridal Shower Workshops are being planned at Debbie Bryan, a Nottingham-based independent creative retailer to support stakeholders through the different stages of the ‘gifting’ process for hybrid artefacts. Focusing on the complex giver/receiver relationship, participants will be introduced to tagging technology, receive support on how to produce a ‘gift’ for someone else and how to link digital content within their ‘gifts’.

More details will follow shortly.